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Rickles and Pickles

Rickles an Pickles is a comedy juggling and magic team of Rick Wellington and tommEE pickles. Known for great shows and huge audiences. Rickles and Pickles have a forty minute show. They are a professional performing magician and a fire throwing juggling act.  They talk about how they open and close their act which is a bit different. They travel all around the country doing their act . They have a forty minute act - that starts with a trunk being pulled in and our magician, Tommy Pickles - opens the lid of the trunk and out pops a bunny -,who is then told - to start juggling. At the end of the act they switch places in the bunny costume and trunk. Check them out on their Facebook page! ********************************************************************

By |2019-05-17T00:00:05+00:00April 27th, 2019|Jugglers, Magic, Rickles and Pickles, Rickles and Pickles|0 Comments

The Crazy Daysies

Rebecca Day and her sister Jen Day Thompson make up a swampy feeling band called "The Crazy Daysies". They are an acoustic based country music group out of Jacksonville, Florida. Both of the sisters write music. They also feature a percussionist  Beau Littles when called for. Rebecca is a full time musician and also performs solo. Some of their wonderful regular clients are : Ragtime Tavern at the beaches of Jacksonville ,Brick Oven at Fleming Island in Florida, and Sven Bridges Brewery in Jacksonville.   They have released an EP, several singles, and most recently a full album called Mile Markers. They have performed too at  fairs and festivals including the Greater Jacksonville Fair, The Blue Crab Fest in Palatka (Florida) and and Porchfest in Jacksonville. Here is a list of their : Upcoming Shows Below is a podcast interview with Rebecca done on March 6th, 2019.  It is also being featured on our website Countyfairgrounds.net - on our EntertainersforHire page - . YES, we are back to doing interviews - and hopefully we can help some of you entertainers get booked!

By |2019-03-26T21:16:50+00:00March 8th, 2019|Podcast, The Crazy Daysies|0 Comments

Florida State Fair 2019

Discover the Fun at the Florida State Fair Pre Fair interview with the Assistant Manager of the Florida State Fair - Mike Rogalsky. We talk about what is new and exciting at this years Fair. We talk about parking, Seniors and what is good for children under 12 to do. Of course we talk about fair food, the exhibit building the animal exhibits, the carnival and a lot of their entertainment.

Arizona State Fair 2018

Arizona State Fair takes place this year - October 5th-28th, in Phoenix.. at  1826 W McDowell Rd. Some of the featured performances are  (with many more on their website): featuring Gary Allan on October 5th October 10th , True Willy: Tribute to Willie Nelson AND 38 Special at the Veteran's Memorial Coliseum October 11th, the Wallflowers at Veteran's Memorial Coliseum  October 17th Pitbull at Veteran's Memorial Coliseum  October 17th Anthrax at Veteran's Memorial Coliseum  October 20th Big + Rich at Veteran's Memorial Coliseum There are a lot of various CONTESTS also - Facebook Contest, Cooking Contest, Eating Contest, Creative Contests and Livestock Entries Check out the Egyptian Exhibit - 2018 Arizona State Fair: King Tut and the Egyptian Treasures - Tickets</strong? A ONCE-IN- A LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY DIRECTLY FROM EGYPT Behold the legendary treasures of king Tutankhamun Ninety six years after its amazing discovery in the Valley of the Kings or We bring Egyptian heritage to you The artifacts focus on the world-famous tomb of King Tutankhamun, Ramses II, Nifertary, Tuthmosis III, Alexander the Great, Cleopatra VII and artifacts from the Coptic and Islamic museum of art. Arizona State Fair - Pre-Fair Interview with Brianda Martinez, in Public Relations *****************

Carnival Catastrophe

Carnival Catastrophe: Is there a Real Reason to be Afraid? Counties and Cities with Carnivals or Fairs There are over 3,000 counties in our country.  There are almost 20,000 cities and towns.  Just about every one of them has at least one carnival or fair, and in the case of the bigger cities, perhaps dozens every year. According to data from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) it comes in at about 4,400 injuries annually but only about 1.5% of that number (66) require hospitalization each year.  Complied statistics for (non-Amusement Park) carnival and fair injuries or deaths are calculated to be 6 per 100,000 visitors, or 0.006%. Not only is the number quite small, but the classification of injuries is quite broad, including anything requiring treatment or hospitalization.  Everything from twisted ankles or sprains, bumped heads, chest pains, numbness, neck strains, back pain, dizziness, and vomiting all count. If you were to pick a large amusement park, such as Disney World with its 19.33 million visitors each year, and apply those statistics, you might expect 1,160 injuries per year.  Big parks are actually much better than that because they have permanent equipment that stays in one place, and experienced maintenance crews with multiple inspections per day. An actual Carnival incident In July (2017), when one of the rides at the Ohio State Fair experienced a severe failure, an 18-year-old man was killed.  A further six were injured.  Despite undergoing three separate inspections, by the operator, the city officials, and an independent third party, they all missed some significant corrosion for one of the seating areas.  The metal was thin enough to shear when the ride was under strain with a full load of passengers. Who is to blame? In this particular case, the manufacturer had issued a notice about the fault in the ride considerably earlier.  They had notified, or attempted to notify, all purchasers, of the potential danger of failure and recommended not using the ride until repairs could be effected. These carnivals and fairs do a lot of traveling, meaning that equipment is assembled and disassembled daily or weekly, moving from one location to the next.  It might be hard to keep up with notices, warnings, alerts, or changing maintenance requirements when you’re constantly on the go.  But perhaps, you would think, workers familiar with the equipment might notice changes and deterioration. Except that they might not…  It might be invisible because it is encased in fiberglass, or in other ways hidden from view.  [...]

By |2019-03-13T23:33:01+00:00November 21st, 2017|Carnivals, injuries, Insurance, Kiddie|0 Comments

Oklahoma State Fair 2017

The Oklahoma State Fair is about to open on September 14th, with all kinds of new and exciting things. There is a lot of stuff to do here for the ten dollar admission costs. This is an interview with Scott Munz , Vice President of Marketing and Public Relations about all the new and great things at this years event. Listening to this for a few minutes will give you a great overview of the fair and all the fancy new fair foods they have. Come hungry and come rested and be prepared to have a great time.!!! Oklahoma State Fair - Frequently Asked Questions!    

7 Rock & Roll Festivals that Changed History (For Better or Worse)

7 Rock & Roll Festivals, - or Hooligans causing a ruckus. That’s modern music in a nutshell, right? Don’t be so quick to judge! After all, you may have been one of those hooligans. Today we are reviewing 7 Rock & Roll festivals that altered public perception figuratively and literally. But first, we need to look at Rock’s roots. Beatles or Stones notwithstanding, Rock & Roll has a uniquely American flavor. March 21st, 1952: The Moondog Coronation Ball Where: Cleveland, Ohio What went right: Walk down a music store aisle 65 years earlier and you’d notice records sorted by ethnicity. One man decided music was colorblind. Sportscaster Sportscaster Alan Freed liked this Rhythm & Blues thing. And, despite being marketed towards African-Americans, young Americans did too. Record store owner, Leo Mintz, exclaimed to Freed, “Kids are rockin’ and rollin’ in the aisles to these records, but they won’t buy them!” Freed would bring R&B to the masses. Freed changed gears and became “King of Moondoggers” for WJW radio. His late-night program broadcast artists of all backgrounds to all Americans. Having cornered the market, Freed’s next move would be to host “the most terrible ball of them all.”  The Moondog Coronation Ball at 3717 Euclid Avenue is America’s first Rock & Roll concert. Though pre-Civil Rights Movement, Freed’s audience was multi-racial. African-American patrons were elated to discover that their champion was white. What went wrong: Moondog’s Coronation Ball promised an eclectic lineup. It never made it past the first song. No one could have anticipated the turnout. 20,000 attendees spilled in to the 10,000 capacity Cleveland Arena. Unbeknownst to ticket holders, Freed arranged follow-up dates. A printing error omitted this detail. Counterfeiting contributed to the exaggerated attendance. Irate attendees broke the central glass panel. A riot erupted and law officials broke up the concert.   July 25th, 1965: Newport Folk Festival Where: Newport, Rhode Island What went right: Bob Dylan owes his career to the Newport Folk Festival. It was the first venue he achieved national recognition. His second performance marked a public transition from acoustic to electric. What went wrong: It’s understandable that Dylan’s audience felt they held stake in his career and image. The organizer, according to roadie Jonathon Taplin, discouraged electric sound. Dylan opened with electric version of Maggie’s Farm. Boos immediately erupted from the crowd. Dylan and company left the stage after the booing made their sound inaudible. He would not play at the festival for 37 years.   January 21st, [...]

By |2019-03-15T02:18:20+00:00June 30th, 2016|Festivals, Music, Rock|0 Comments

9 Steps to the PERFECT Music Festival

32 million people attend music festivals each year.  Are you interested in hosting the PERFECT Music Festival? Is yours on their radar? Hosting the perfect music festival is not easy. Talent aside, there are monetary, zoning, and scheduling considerations. County Fair USA breaks down what makes the best festivals tick. Follow each step for an event that can't be beat! Step 1) Fund your music festival Firefly Music Festival in Delaware is nothing less than an underdog success story. Their festival raised $1 million within 24 hours of launch. Yes, 24 hours plus 5 years of planning. You've got an idea, but what's your pitch? A music festival is a pipe dream without money. A sad fact is that profit is the only reason suits would take a shot on an eager upstart. Bootstrapping will be your primary option until the festival inevitably scales up (Am I being presumptuous? Of course!). Firefly built expertise hosting smaller, niche events. Investors won't take a shot on festivals that aim too high. If you're more an 'ideas kind of guy/gal', hire someone that has been down this road. Crowdfunding websites like Kickstarter and GoFundMe let amateurs test the waters. Hell, even experienced planners use crowdfunding to quickly build capital. The premise is simple: Pitch your festival online. People from all over the world can back your project. If there is demand, it will reach appropriate funding before a deadline. Combine crowdfunding with social media for maximum exposure. Facebook Pages are mandatory! Younger attendees prefer to keep friends in the loop on Facebook and Twitter. Proposition other event managers in your niche. Most local establishments are keen to help entrepreneurs because this opens a cross-promotional avenue. Don't be discouraged if your project fails to garner adequate backing. Even festivals boasting world-famous headliners flop. Rock band 'My Bloody Valentine' agreed to headline Hop Farm Music Festival in Kent, England. A hostile economic climate killed its momentum. There could be a number of reasons for an initial failure. Pinpoint costs down to the last toilet paper roll and be prepared to recalculate your budget several times. Don't be surprised to break even your first time 'round. Potential backers desire some semblance of structure. Work through the remaining steps on our list before making your pitch.   Step 2) Insure your music festival You name it, someone's insured it. So why not music festivals? Festivals are a profit-making enterprise like any brick-and-mortar business. City/town officials will regard it as such. Suppose an errant cigarette [...]

By |2019-03-15T02:22:04+00:00May 9th, 2016|Festivals, Food, Music, Rock|0 Comments

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